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The Teeth from Majunga by Qilong The Teeth from Majunga by Qilong
Majungasaurus, a name with history, although not many people really think about it.

In the late 1800's, some odd teeth from Madagascar were given the name Megalosaurus crenatissimus. Those days, virtually all carnivorous dinosaurs of a relatively large size were considered belonging to this "catch-basket" of Megalosaurus, but this would prove problematic when, in the mid 1900s, a lower jaw was found on Madagascar with the same kinds of teeth, but this jaw was very different from that distinct Megalosaurus bucklandii jaw, curved and with rough texturing on the outside. It was given the name Majungasaurus, the "lizard from Majunga", a name for the region where the fossils were found. Not long thereafter, a small portion of skull was found and given the name Majungatholus atopus, and was considered a weird pachycephalosaur. With new discoveries of skeletons on Madagascar, these fossils can all be considered the same animal, and the first name has priority, thus ... Majungasaurus crenatissimus.

Note on anatomy: Not all of the bones come from a single animal. Many different animals are known, but some only preserve a few of the bits and pieces, which makes composing a single skeleton tricky as some of those individuals are smaller, younger, than others. This is done here with elements scaled to "fit" to the largest specimen that is the most complete, which includes the skull. You get a long, low-bodies, short-legged, stumpy-armed, and weird-headed animal.
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:iconroseynick:
roseynick Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2014  Student Interface Designer
I hope he doesn't get an itchy nose haha
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:iconkaijukid23:
Kaijukid23 Featured By Owner Jun 10, 2014
Well, he may just rub it on anything. And reptiles have better protection againts insect bites IMO.
P.s. dont wanna act as a smartypants here
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:iconroseynick:
roseynick Featured By Owner Jun 27, 2014  Student Interface Designer
I was only joking, but thank you very much for your feedback
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:iconshinyaquablueribbon:
ShinyAquaBlueRibbon Featured By Owner Mar 1, 2012  Student General Artist
No wonder I was confused by this dinosaur--I still thought it was called "Majungatholus", so I thought "Majungasaurus" was wrong. XD
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Mar 1, 2012
It is that, too. The issue is a little complicated: [link]
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:iconshinyaquablueribbon:
ShinyAquaBlueRibbon Featured By Owner Mar 1, 2012  Student General Artist
I see, that IS complicated. O_O
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:iconcryptidsaurian:
cryptidsaurian Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
it looks like it has vey large braincase for a theropod of this size.
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2010
Seems pretty typical of abelisaurids, though.
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:iconcryptidsaurian:
cryptidsaurian Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
well, I looked at carnotaurus and it's seemed rather small, but with nearly other abelisaurid i'f agree with you on
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2010
Carnotaurus's head is rather short for its height, so any skull on a similar-sized body will seem larger. Carnotaurus is rather unusual among abelisaurids, rather than Majungasaurus.
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:iconcryptidsaurian:
cryptidsaurian Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
ok thanks and I have one nore question, how do you think I dinosaur like majungasaurus would hunt, it seems like it would be a rather inaffective hunter with such short legs...
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2010
Short legs, plus strong jaws, and a powerful bite-force generator and a long neck like that? It was probably an ambush predator, rather than a pursuit predator like dogs, and you get animals like that in the form of leopards and such. The idea is that it relies one a strong initial attack to overwhelm and kill its prey quickly than a long drawn out chase to exhaust it, and this requires not so much speed as strength.
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:iconcryptidsaurian:
cryptidsaurian Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
huh, well I thought it may have behaved like a crocidile waiting for a sauropod to bring it's head down for a drink and then grab ir by the neck and suffocate it but your probably right :)
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:iconalgoroth:
Algoroth Featured By Owner Jul 20, 2011  Professional General Artist
I love the picture your theory conjures up for me! I have to do a pic of it!
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(1 Reply)
:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Apr 18, 2010
Well, that's not that problematic; most crocs ARE ambush predators.
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(1 Reply)
:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2010
Large head, yes; but that's to be expected for abelisaurs.
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:iconcryptidsaurian:
cryptidsaurian Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
well, I meant the area where I thought the braincase was, but I guess I was wrong :/
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2010
Inside the skull itself? I seems to be about the right size. You may be seeing a lot more of it due to a high infratemporal fenestra (in this illustration). But most of that is the pterygoid process of the quadrate, which has little to due with the braincase aside from sharing a few muscle attachments and supporting the otic structure along with the braincase. There is a tall crest at the back of the skull, and in this case it is the largest of any abelisaurid, but this is an extension of the parietal and supraoccipital bones (and to an extent, the squamosals) and their function is to support jaw closing muscles anteriorly, and head-lifting/neck-straightening/neck-lifting muscles posteriorly. This is "technically" part of the braincase.
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:iconcryptidsaurian:
cryptidsaurian Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
ok, I understood very little of that but I think I get the gist of what your getting at :)
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2008
I have a notorious fetish for ceratosaurs...

Excellent work.
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:iconhaxeman:
Haxeman Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2008
Patrick o'connor showed during the III congres of vertebrate paleontology new Majungasaurus remains, wich include new complete/articulated subadults specimens, and comlpete forelimbs!
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2008
I've known something about these, but will wait for them to be published before I add them in.
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:iconsteelelord:
SteeleLord Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2008
cool
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:iconsmallnaughtyorc:
SmallNaughtyOrc Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2008  Professional Digital Artist
wooo:wow: this is very beautiful! :hug:
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2008
Thanks!
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:iconsmallnaughtyorc:
SmallNaughtyOrc Featured By Owner Jan 4, 2009  Professional Digital Artist
;)
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:icondustdevil:
dustdevil Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2008  Professional General Artist
I'm still disturbed by the strange proportions of legs compared to the body length and shortness of the tail. Like it surely could fail as a wrong proportioned toy. Am I the only one?
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2008
No, I fairly think it's prevalent throughout most workers. The idea seems odd. However, the short legs with longer proximal elements does proportion the power in those elements, so it was VERY strong legged, but focused at the hip, then the knee. The very robust bones also imply a good ability to dig, kick, and the animal may have needed it just to turn while at speed.
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:iconnemo-ramjet:
nemo-ramjet Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2008
Some people consider these critters to be (at least partially,) aquatic. What's your idea on the subject?
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2008
I don't think this animal was. That implication usually gets tied to Masiakasaurus, which deserves that implication given its teeth. Swimming may also explain the leg proportions to some degree.
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:iconsphenacodon:
Sphenacodon Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2008
Ah, the weirdness of abelisaurs.
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:iconmiyess:
Miyess Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2008   Digital Artist
This is awesome! Question; how many specimens are there?
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2008
Quite a few. These are the most complete. Articulated elements are treated as a single specimen, but the total list is about 20+, and that's based on isolated vertebrae, not whole skeletons.
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