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Tuck's Different-Toothed Lizard by Qilong Tuck's Different-Toothed Lizard by Qilong
This is my favorite ornithischian, a skeletal I did for a friend of a friend (and oddly, my only commissioned skeletal illustration). Heterodontosaurus tucki, the "first" sabre-toothed dinosaur, is a pretty interesting critter, with large mobile hands, feet, and large "fangs," there's been some suggestion that these basal ornithischians were effective omnivores, and probably included more meat in their diet than just a "generalist" diet might suggest.

As an "added bonus," this skeletal appears in this post: [link] where I discuss the two groupings of heterodontosaurids, as well as the skull of this is illustrated beautifully here: [link] and here: [link]
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:icondinodanthetrainman:
dinodanthetrainman Featured By Owner Oct 23, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
it looks like a Chupacabra and could it grab things with its hands
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:iconimrandomartist:
ImRandomArtist Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012
ummm why is the spine's tail missing section of it's bone? like there are two section missing it's bone
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012
The skeletal drawing here isn't an illustration of the full, complete skeleton. It is, instead, an illustration of the largest, best known specimen, called SAM PK K1334. The specimen is virtually complete, missing a few cervical ribs and sections of the tail. I forwent illustrating the cervical ribs here, but will try to add them back in.
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:iconimrandomartist:
ImRandomArtist Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2012
ah, thanks for explaining that, and wow that is really cool!
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:iconeorhythm:
eorhythm Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Easily one of my favourite dinosaurs, if not favourite.
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:iconpeteridish:
PeteriDish Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
awesome!
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012  Professional
Very nice! Thank you for a wonderful skeletal, again.

How mobile were the hands, really? Probably more than maniraptorans, but were they even nearly as mobile and useful as, say, in raccoons or primates?
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012
They were probably very mobile. The carpals are block like, but no more than ours would be, and there are extensive joint surfaces for the phalanges, with extensor pits. No distinct features indicating thewrist couldn't pronate, so the posture shown in the illustration is a "static supination" pose; it was a "basic" posture I used for the illustration, without really trying for an expression of mobility. I think it could certainly be useful for grasping and manipulation, but I wouldn't know how much at my current level of understanding.
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:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012  Professional
Interesting. So if I would like to imagine an intelligent, tool-using dinosaur, heterodontosaurs would be the ancestors of choice. :)
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012
Well, they were probably one of the most "manipulative" early dinosaurs. I wonder at the relative flexibility of their shoulders compared, say, to coelophysids which lived at the same approximate time and place. Possibly better?
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:iconhyrotrioskjan:
Hyrotrioskjan Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012  Professional General Artist
Nice one :thumbsup:
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