Deviant Login Shop  Join deviantART for FREE Take the Tour
×



Details

Submitted on
August 31, 2011
Image Size
2.7 MB
Resolution
4200×2100
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
941 (1 today)
Favourites
18 (who?)
Comments
8
Downloads
57

License

Creative Commons License
Some rights reserved. This work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.
×
Triassic Palate Mashers by Qilong Triassic Palate Mashers by Qilong
Here munches a small placodont sauropterygian "reptile," Placochelys placodonta. The skull is shown with its jaw agape on the left, and closed on the right. The snout does not terminate in teeth, and instead sported an upper and lower pair of cylindrical rods with no clear texturing to incidate they were covered in a rhamphothecal beak. Instead, they may have supported a mass of soft tissue that would make the skull fairly rounded. But that's a soft-tissue issue (ha!) for another time.

There were only four lower teeth, two to a side, and ten upper teeth, five to each side, and where two of which were on each paired palatine bone. They were large, broad, and flat, and had shallow roots. These teeth have been likened to the rough pads on the palates of manatees, but may have just been good crushing surfaces for hard foods.

Like most other cyamodontoid placodontans, the rear of the skull is very, very broad and "crowned" in horn-like nodes that likely supported keratin extensions, and might have resembled some lizards such as Phrynosoma.

I go into more detail here: [link] .
Add a Comment:
 
:iconemperordinobot:
Placodonts are amazing creatures. Well...were.

Will you do Henodus?
Reply
:iconemperordinobot:
Yay for Henodus. This creature I've seen very poorly illustrated.
Reply
:iconqilong:
Because other cyamodontoids bring more attention. Less weird.
Reply
:iconpilsator:
pilsator Sep 12, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Henodus will out-weird the above extreme oddball by an insane distance.
Reply
:iconqilong:
There's a bit of oddbally-ness to it, yes, not as much as has been made out, but it's there.
Reply
:iconzippo4k:
I love your skull restorations, and your use of stippling is very skilled.

So was this animal a diapsid reptile? I know it's resemblance to a chelonian is superficial, but I still feel compelled to ask.
Reply
:iconqilong:
Yes, and so may chelonians be diapsids. The same is true for ichthyosaurs, which were so-called "euryapsids." Nonetheless, these guys are related to plesiosaurs and ichthyosaurs (Sauropterygii), but basally.
Reply
Add a Comment: