Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login
The Squirrel Immitator by Qilong The Squirrel Immitator by Qilong
Scirurumimus albersdoerferi is based on a baby animal, possibly not that many week past hatching to be considered a "toddler" by dino standards. He'd likely still have a mommy looking out for him, but would be in the "wandering duckling" stage of life. This guy is a little bit on the "amazing" side, though, because even as a baby, he has exceptionally long filaments of stage I feathers (so-called "dinofuzz") and they abound around his tail, so as to give the base of his tail a very plume-y, fluffed out appearance ... like a squirrel. More on him here: [link]

As mentioned here: [link]

(BTW, there is a certain "theme" to his patterning. This theme is not meant to be political. I may have to color it....)
Add a Comment:
 
:iconhammertheshark:
hammertheshark Featured By Owner Aug 18, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
IT'S SO FLUFFY~!
Reply
:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Aug 20, 2012
Yes, yes it is! That was the idea!
Reply
:iconhammertheshark:
hammertheshark Featured By Owner Aug 20, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
:iconpuffsharkplz:
Reply
:iconpalaeorigamipete:
palaeorigamipete Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
wonderful!
Reply
:iconmarcoornithodira:
marcoornithodira Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Megalosaur or not, that's the cutest thing ever.
Reply
:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Aug 4, 2012
Heehee. Thanks
Reply
:iconhyrotrioskjan:
Hyrotrioskjan Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2012  Professional General Artist
Sooooo cute =D one of the best Sciurumimus so far :thumbsup:
Reply
:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Aug 4, 2012
Thanks! I was trying to go with the design, and play along with the "ultra-feathered" and "long tail" threads of art. It seems to have worked.
Reply
:iconhyrotrioskjan:
Hyrotrioskjan Featured By Owner Aug 4, 2012  Professional General Artist
Indeed :nod:
Reply
:iconkazuma27:
Kazuma27 Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
What a satisfied expression he has! :D
Reply
:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2012
As I was detailing it, I realized the expression of the eyes wasn't quite getting to where it needed to be, so I pulled some other details to bring the eyes into more of a bemused, smug sense. This is also why the "brow" is inclined and covers the eye so. Without the slight upturn, it looked snotty and decreased focus on the eye.
Reply
:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2012
Do you think the tail was flexible enough that Otto could wrap it around him/herself when she slept? That would at least make some sense of the tail. Or it might have been a signal for it's mommy. I suppose the size difference between baby and parent theropods was often so large that the kids got easily lost. Or stepped on.
Reply
:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2012
I think that if specimens of "stiff-tailed" theropods like Mei long could, then certainly more "flexible-tailed" animals without the longer stiffening features of the distal vertebrae could. Here, the flexibility is certainly far less tightly curled than in Mei long, so certainly it would be possible!
Reply
:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2012
Oh, I had forgotten about Mei long. Yes, if it could, things with less stiff tails sure could as well.

Awesome work, by the way. I love the tail feathers. They look realistic even though they aren't like any feathers I can think of existing now.
Reply
:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jul 29, 2012
I like to think of them as plumes, as in living birds. They probably were like this, with a distal splay of feather-like feathers (heh) at the end of the tail, but more filament-like stuff around much of the rest of the body, but still with vanes and stuff. It's hard to tell, given that the preservation, while nice, is far from ideal.
Reply
:iconeurwentala:
Eurwentala Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2012
Ah, I see now. They are just less stiff than the plumes of flying birds, and that's why they look different, right?

One more thing I like in this is that the critter is actually using its hands for something. Too often the hands of theropods just seem to uselessly hang in there, as if they were just waiting to become wings.
Reply
:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2012
Maybe less stiff. Even a ridiculously long feather (i.e., peacock tail plumes) bend much more than typical feathers. I've simply projected more playful curvature and "fluffy" ends, as though they had barbs that were "puffed out", hence my comparison to ostrich feathers.
Reply
Add a Comment:
 
×
  • Art Print
  • Canvas
  • Photo
  • Art Gifts




Details

Submitted on
July 26, 2012
Image Size
3.8 MB
Resolution
5400×3900
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
1,359
Favourites
47 (who?)
Comments
17

License

Creative Commons License
Some rights reserved. This work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.
×