Shop More Submit  Join Login
×
  • Art Print
  • Canvas
  • Photo
Download JPG 3000 × 2100




Details

Submitted on
February 21, 2011
Image Size
419 KB
Resolution
3000×2100
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
2,661 (3 today)
Favourites
42 (who?)
Comments
29
Downloads
121

License

Creative Commons License
Some rights reserved. This work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.
×
Spines, Thorns, and Spikes by Qilong Spines, Thorns, and Spikes by Qilong
The "Egyptian spine lizard," this animal has been of some puzzle to scientists due both to the strange form of the spines, and to the lack of current ability to study the material shown above, which were destroyed during WWII (as a result of American bombing runs over München during WWII).

The spinal configuration differs from other published configurations.

A shows the primary hypothesis, which places the spines in order from dorsal vertebra 3(or 4) all way to an anterior caudal (also the longest of the spines). The profile of the sail is shorter than in B, which is a secondary hypothesis and follows Stromer's positioning for all vertebrae with a few exceptions, differing primarily in placing the first two spines as dorsals 1 and 3 instead of 3 and 5.

Update: I should note that this skeletal does not include the various other fragementary bits and pieces as well as nearly complete ribs that von Stromer described. this is not meant to be a skeletal diagram in the form of my others, but instead a figurative piece meant for another, more technical venue.

I modified the contour of the silhouette, to accentuate the lack of a cohesive, muscular or fatty margin to the tips of the neural spines. This won't be explained here. I also added a missing centrum into the dorsal series, appropriately placed in both versions (in two different locations, essentially). This centrum was associated with the tallest spine by all other authors, but is clearly an anterior dorsal centrum instead, and thus cannot articulate with the spine.
Add a Comment:
 
:iconspongebobfossilpants:
Hey, nice. Do you plan on doing a traditional skeletal of the creature?
Reply
:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2011
Yes. Eventually.
Reply
:icontyrannosaurusprime:
TyrannosaurusPrime Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2011
Just asking, how big is your estimation if the size of Spinosaurus?:confused:
Reply
:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2011
I have no estimate for the size. The first and type specimen (now lost) is (or was) not a fully-developed adult animal, so it is likely that any actual estimates are shy based on age of the individual.
Reply
:icontyrannosaurusprime:
TyrannosaurusPrime Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2011
Ok thanks! :iconironhideawesomeplz:
Reply
:iconadinosupremacist:
aDinoSupremacist Featured By Owner Oct 29, 2011  Student Digital Artist
This is the biggest problem I have with Spinosaurus. There are too few bones for this creature and we all assume it looks like what it appears to be in JPIII or other media. Are some of the bones similar to the ones found in Baryonyx?
Reply
:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2011
Yes. The vertebrae are very similar, although there are differences. The big difference is in the jaw and teeth.
Reply
:iconalgoroth:
Algoroth Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2011  Professional General Artist
Frankly, I think it was humped, not finned. Based on the photos I've seen of the original bones and Stromer's paper. I could be wrong!
Reply
:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jul 18, 2011
There's a lot more to say on this subject, but not much I can in DA. Suffice it to say, the essential basis of the argument is that there are actually three different types of tall-spined tetrapods, and mammals exhibit one, and things like dimetrodon exhibit another; animals like chameleons exhibit a third. Humps or fatty or muscular pads only appear in the mammal-type, which requires relatively thick spines and broad ends. Spinosaurs have chameleon-like spines, and Acrocanthosaurus has an intermediate form, broad spines but without distal expansions. This means the issue is more complex than "hump or no hump."
Reply
:iconalgoroth:
Algoroth Featured By Owner Jul 20, 2011  Professional General Artist
Now that is a scary thought: a chameleon Spinosaurus hiding in plain sight, waiting for one of us to walk along.
Reply
Add a Comment: