Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login
Spines, Thorns, and Spikes by Qilong Spines, Thorns, and Spikes by Qilong
The "Egyptian spine lizard," this animal has been of some puzzle to scientists due both to the strange form of the spines, and to the lack of current ability to study the material shown above, which were destroyed during WWII (as a result of American bombing runs over München during WWII).

The spinal configuration differs from other published configurations.

A shows the primary hypothesis, which places the spines in order from dorsal vertebra 3(or 4) all way to an anterior caudal (also the longest of the spines). The profile of the sail is shorter than in B, which is a secondary hypothesis and follows Stromer's positioning for all vertebrae with a few exceptions, differing primarily in placing the first two spines as dorsals 1 and 3 instead of 3 and 5.

Update: I should note that this skeletal does not include the various other fragementary bits and pieces as well as nearly complete ribs that von Stromer described. this is not meant to be a skeletal diagram in the form of my others, but instead a figurative piece meant for another, more technical venue.

I modified the contour of the silhouette, to accentuate the lack of a cohesive, muscular or fatty margin to the tips of the neural spines. This won't be explained here. I also added a missing centrum into the dorsal series, appropriately placed in both versions (in two different locations, essentially). This centrum was associated with the tallest spine by all other authors, but is clearly an anterior dorsal centrum instead, and thus cannot articulate with the spine.
Add a Comment:
 
:iconspongebobfossilpants:
Hey, nice. Do you plan on doing a traditional skeletal of the creature?
Reply
:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2011
Yes. Eventually.
Reply
:icontyrannosaurusprime:
TyrannosaurusPrime Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2011
Just asking, how big is your estimation if the size of Spinosaurus?:confused:
Reply
:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2011
I have no estimate for the size. The first and type specimen (now lost) is (or was) not a fully-developed adult animal, so it is likely that any actual estimates are shy based on age of the individual.
Reply
:icontyrannosaurusprime:
TyrannosaurusPrime Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2011
Ok thanks! :iconironhideawesomeplz:
Reply
:iconadinosupremacist:
aDinoSupremacist Featured By Owner Oct 29, 2011  Student Digital Artist
This is the biggest problem I have with Spinosaurus. There are too few bones for this creature and we all assume it looks like what it appears to be in JPIII or other media. Are some of the bones similar to the ones found in Baryonyx?
Reply
:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2011
Yes. The vertebrae are very similar, although there are differences. The big difference is in the jaw and teeth.
Reply
:iconalgoroth:
Algoroth Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2011  Professional General Artist
Frankly, I think it was humped, not finned. Based on the photos I've seen of the original bones and Stromer's paper. I could be wrong!
Reply
:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jul 18, 2011
There's a lot more to say on this subject, but not much I can in DA. Suffice it to say, the essential basis of the argument is that there are actually three different types of tall-spined tetrapods, and mammals exhibit one, and things like dimetrodon exhibit another; animals like chameleons exhibit a third. Humps or fatty or muscular pads only appear in the mammal-type, which requires relatively thick spines and broad ends. Spinosaurs have chameleon-like spines, and Acrocanthosaurus has an intermediate form, broad spines but without distal expansions. This means the issue is more complex than "hump or no hump."
Reply
:iconalgoroth:
Algoroth Featured By Owner Jul 20, 2011  Professional General Artist
Now that is a scary thought: a chameleon Spinosaurus hiding in plain sight, waiting for one of us to walk along.
Reply
:iconthediremoose:
thediremoose Featured By Owner Sep 11, 2011
Oh, get real. There's obviously no way a creature like that couOM NOM NOM NOM NOM
Reply
:iconalgoroth:
Algoroth Featured By Owner Sep 11, 2011  Professional General Artist
Crunch-crunch-CRUNCH! MMMMMMMMMMMM-MMMMMMMMM-GOOD! :)
Reply
:iconzombiesaurian:
ZombieSaurian Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2011  Student Digital Artist
Very interesting and different! I'm reading your article on this now. Though I must say, this is a far "cooler" looking animal and more intimidating.
Reply
:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Mar 31, 2011
There should at some point be something far more technical following this, but not too soon.
Reply
:iconeriorguez:
Eriorguez Featured By Owner Feb 24, 2011
The sail makes more sense in that position. Still, there are things that just strike me as odd in that outline...
Reply
:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Feb 24, 2011
Care to explain the oddity?
Reply
:iconeriorguez:
Eriorguez Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2011
The thing is, I don't know. I think it may be the ventral portion of the body being quite slender here, incluiding legs and tail, and them giving an weird image. It is just that I get an impression of oddity. Oh well, I guess that is bound to happen to anybody with Spinosaurus at least once.
Reply
:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2011
I probably did reconstruct it too "gracile" and not massively robust, but the thing is, much of the size of the animal is apparent rather than real, because of the sail. Bulk of the animal is implied in very rounded ribs, which gave it a very "barrel"-shaped body in some respects, but I figure it was as light as Carcharodontosaurus.
Reply
:iconeriorguez:
Eriorguez Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2011
I recall hearing from Mickey Mortimer that Spinosaur vertebrae are much less pneumaticed that those of Allosauroids or Tyrannosaurids, possibly implying the animal was more dense that other giant theropods, and that would be on acordance with Spinosaurus spending much of its time in water. Spinosaurs as far as I recall also seem to have more of an "horizontal" build than other theropods, even if not that aparent due to the high neural spines.

Still, 30% of musculature attachment is about 60 centimeters in the largest spines, and that is more that in any other theropod, if I understood it right.
Reply
:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Mar 31, 2011
The external structure of spinosaur (megalosauroid, really) vertebrae indeed lack the extent of pneumatic depressions, fossae, or foramina that occur in neotetanuran (allosauroids + coelurosaurs) vertebrae.

Reconstruction of the epaxial musculature would require more extensive analysis, and more extensive material, to reasonably assert precisely where the muscles are located on the spines. The first step is building a virtual dorsal series, then extrapolate what we can scientifically verify from it osteologically, then work from there.
Reply
:iconpalaeozoologist:
palaeozoologist Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
Very nice, I think this feels more "real" than previous skeletal restorations of Spinosaurus. It's so inspiring, in fact, I may just have to do a life restoration based of of these reconstructions. Great job! :)
Reply
:iconhellraptor:
Hellraptor Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
that sail makes it look even more intimidating than many other reconstructions ive seen. if it looked like this other animals must have been scared just by looking at it.
Reply
:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2011
Well, this guy is found in the same deposits as another large theropod, Carcharodontosaurus, which was pretty intimidating itself.
Reply
:iconhellraptor:
Hellraptor Featured By Owner Feb 24, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
yes i know, they were both apex predtors in that area.
Reply
:iconredintooth:
RedinTooth Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2011
This looks a lot like the skeletal made by Andrea Cau.

Did you draw any inspiration?
Reply
:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2011
Not really. I've been kicking this idea around for years (I first did the project this is based on almost 10 years ago).
Reply
:iconskull-island-master:
Skull-Island-Master Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2011
do you think it had a sail or a hump ??
Reply
:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2011
The shape of the spines do not appear to support muscles beyond the first 30% or even less of the spines, so it looks like a sail instead.
Reply
:iconolofmoleman:
olofmoleman Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2011  Student Digital Artist
Interesting, the sail seems much larger than pretty much every other reconstruction I've seen.
Reply
:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2011
That's part of my conclusions: [link]
Reply
Add a Comment:
 
×
  • Art Print
  • Canvas
  • Photo
Download JPG 3000 × 2100




Details

Submitted on
February 21, 2011
Image Size
419 KB
Resolution
3000×2100
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
2,820
Favourites
43 (who?)
Comments
29
Downloads
123

License

Creative Commons License
Some rights reserved. This work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.
×